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Lovelyjubly

Bicep tendonitis

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Yeah, I had it a couple of years ago in my left arm. Weekly sessions at a very good physio sorted it in about 5-6 weeks. I didn't stop training though. I just smashed legs instead of training upper body and did cardio.

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9 minutes ago, tiny76 said:

Yeah, I had it a couple of years ago in my left arm. Weekly sessions at a very good physio sorted it in about 5-6 weeks. I didn't stop training though. I just smashed legs instead of training upper body and did cardio.

Cheers mate..

 

Ive got pain in the area but had a few massages from the Mrs. So kinda feels better. But still pain in that area. . Doees feel like i could manage a few light upper body workouts. Would that be silly to do ? Just to keep things flowing.

Thinking of going for a sports massage... what did your physio make you do mate ? And how often?

 

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I'd try to nip it in the bud now. Its prone to damage anyway and this frequently festers away until one day it snaps and half your bicep falls down to your elbow. At that point you either live with deformity, weakness of elbow flexion and a loss of anterior stability in the shoulder or have it reattached by the deltoid and regain appearance, elbow strength but still with a loss of anterior shoulder stability. Go and see a good physio. It can be self treated though. Slow eccentrics will calm it down. So do bicep curls but do all the lifting with your good arm then let the injured one lower the weight really slow. if done every day it will calm it down pretty fast in a few weeks. bicep tendonitis is often concomitant with rotator cuff impingement so it would be worth starting to do stuff to head that off at the pass- rotator cuff innies and outies with a theraband atleast 3X a week to fatigue NOT failure, 3 times as much pulling as pushing and dead hanging off a bar daily for 60 seconds or so will do it.

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16 minutes ago, charlysays said:

I'd try to nip it in the bud now. Its prone to damage anyway and this frequently festers away until one day it snaps and half your bicep falls down to your elbow. At that point you either live with deformity, weakness of elbow flexion and a loss of anterior stability in the shoulder or have it reattached by the deltoid and regain appearance, elbow strength but still with a loss of anterior shoulder stability. Go and see a good physio. It can be self treated though. Slow eccentrics will calm it down. So do bicep curls but do all the lifting with your good arm then let the injured one lower the weight really slow. if done every day it will calm it down pretty fast in a few weeks. bicep tendonitis is often concomitant with rotator cuff impingement so it would be worth starting to do stuff to head that off at the pass- rotator cuff innies and outies with a theraband atleast 3X a week to fatigue NOT failure, 3 times as much pulling as pushing and dead hanging off a bar daily for 60 seconds or so will do it.

Thanks for that mate....

So are you suggesting doing dumbel curls heavier on good arm. Lighter on injured arm. Lowering the weight down slowly to feal the intensity?

Also rotary cuff excersises  with bands ? I did have an injury there a couple of years ago. 

Do you also recommened i dont train the upper body at all until sorted? Ie shoulders , back chest?

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2 hours ago, Lovelyjubly said:

Has anybody had this ? Between side delt and bicep.

Whats the best way to heal it?

How long were you out of training.

I think I have what they call "golfer's elbow" which is different, because pain is around inner elbow / forearm area and yours is in the shoulder area?

I'm about to hit it with a course of BPC 157. I also run maintenance dose of NAC for anti-inflammatory effect and Ipamorelin + Mod GRF 1-29 peptide combo.

I had my problem for years, mostly felt when doing hammer curls, but it was pretty mild. I haven't trained for months during the last lockdown, but fuсking bitch didn't just heal by itself, because when I came back to the gym a month ago it became much worse.

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1 hour ago, charlysays said:

I'd try to nip it in the bud now. Its prone to damage anyway and this frequently festers away until one day it snaps and half your bicep falls down to your elbow.

At that point you either live with deformity, weakness of elbow flexion and a loss of anterior stability in the shoulder or have it reattached by the deltoid and regain appearance, elbow strength but still with a loss of anterior shoulder stability. Go and see a good physio. It can be self treated though. Slow eccentrics will calm it down. So do bicep curls but do all the lifting with your good arm then let the injured one lower the weight really slow. if done every day it will calm it down pretty fast in a few weeks. bicep tendonitis is often concomitant with rotator cuff impingement so it would be worth starting to do stuff to head that off at the pass- rotator cuff innies and outies with a theraband atleast 3X a week to fatigue NOT failure, 3 times as much pulling as pushing and dead hanging off a bar daily for 60 seconds or so will do it.

Where did you read this from? It does not fester and snap. 

Why would he or anyone bother having  anterior shoulder stability surgery if it  results in loss of anterior shoulder stability?   A reason for having this surgery is to gain shoulder stability by operating on the bicep tendon. 

A bit of confusion there, buddy. 


 

 

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I had it a few times as a teenager when I was obsessed with arm wrestling and dumbell curls.  I found as weird as it sounds, to fix it, I slept at night with an arm sleeve on and a ruler or splint down my arm to keep it completely straight all night 

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2 hours ago, GTT said:

I had it a few times as a teenager when I was obsessed with arm wrestling and dumbell curls.  I found as weird as it sounds, to fix it, I slept at night with an arm sleeve on and a ruler or splint down my arm to keep it completely straight all night 

No wanking??!! 

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48 minutes ago, BLUE(UK) said:

No wanking??!! 

No, unfortunately such a small 3 incher and Cumming in 1 min 30 was not enough for tendinitis, 

Do you feel my childhood trauma? 

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4 hours ago, PSevens2017 said:

Where did you read this from? It does not fester and snap. 

Why would he or anyone bother having  anterior shoulder stability surgery if it  results in loss of anterior shoulder stability?   A reason for having this surgery is to gain shoulder stability by operating on the bicep tendon. 

A bit of confusion there, buddy. 


 

 

What I saying was that chronic irritation of the long head of the biceps tendon can lead to it detaching with little significant warning. This has happened to a mate of mine and a number of famous athletes. To quote Lee priest talking about both his long head biceps tendons detaching, "it just snapped, no warning". In reality ofcourse there would have been niggling shoulder pain for probably years before. The same thing happens to the rotator cuff after chronic impingement. It thins, then it rips. As I said lhb and RC tendonitis are often concomitant.

Where did I say that reattaching the LHB tendon has a primary goal of improving anterior instability symptoms? I didn't. Surgery for anterior instability is aimed at restoring the labrum and/ or plicating the anterior capsule. To be more specific I was saying that biceps tenodesis which is the standard way to repair a LHB rupture will result in a loss of anterior stability when compared to keeping the anatomical lhb tendon intact. This is because it is just fixed onto the humerus outside of the shoulder joint rather than the natural anatomy where it follows the bicipital groove beneath the subscapularis tendon all the way to the top of the humerus before attaching to the superior labrum, thus giving the shoulder joint some additional anterior stability when engaged. I was trying to underline to the OP to make a big effort to get shot of the LHB tendonitis because once it snaps it will not usually be able to be repaired anatomically and the loss of an anatomical lhb tendon may exacerbate any anterior instability.

Where's the confusion? Honestly I would be overjoyed if there was a reliable way of repairing the LHB tendon anatomically but it is not usually possible in part due to the pulley at the subscapularis tendon.

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6 hours ago, Lovelyjubly said:

Thanks for that mate....

So are you suggesting doing dumbel curls heavier on good arm. Lighter on injured arm. Lowering the weight down slowly to feal the intensity?

Also rotary cuff excersises  with bands ? I did have an injury there a couple of years ago. 

Do you also recommened i dont train the upper body at all until sorted? Ie shoulders , back chest?

I'd book in to see a physio , you can usually self refer to an NHS one. They will examine and test the shoulder to accurately diagnose it.

To settle tendonitis you only want to eccentrically load the tendon initially as discomfort allows. To get the weight up so your elbow is flexed you'll need to use the good arm to do this reaching across your body as the idea is the injured tendon plays no part in the concentric part of the rep. So this isn't something you'd do as part of a workout really. I would give it some rest from normal workouts for a couple of weeks. You might be surprised how quickly eccentrics can settle tendonitis. I had tennis elbow last year and couldn't even pick up my rucksack with my palm down. Had been grumbling on a few months. 2 weeks of eccentrically loading the tendon every night and I was almost back to normal.

RC exercises a few times a week and bar hanging are just good prevention for anyone who wants good shoulders!

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9 hours ago, charlysays said:

What I saying was that chronic irritation of the long head of the biceps tendon can lead to it detaching with little significant warning. This has happened to a mate of mine and a number of famous athletes. To quote Lee priest talking about both his long head biceps tendons detaching, "it just snapped, no warning". In reality ofcourse there would have been niggling shoulder pain for probably years before. The same thing happens to the rotator cuff after chronic impingement. It thins, then it rips. As I said lhb and RC tendonitis are often concomitant.

Where did I say that reattaching the LHB tendon has a primary goal of improving anterior instability symptoms? I didn't. Surgery for anterior instability is aimed at restoring the labrum and/ or plicating the anterior capsule. To be more specific I was saying that biceps tenodesis which is the standard way to repair a LHB rupture will result in a loss of anterior stability when compared to keeping the anatomical lhb tendon intact. This is because it is just fixed onto the humerus outside of the shoulder joint rather than the natural anatomy where it follows the bicipital groove beneath the subscapularis tendon all the way to the top of the humerus before attaching to the superior labrum, thus giving the shoulder joint some additional anterior stability when engaged. I was trying to underline to the OP to make a big effort to get shot of the LHB tendonitis because once it snaps it will not usually be able to be repaired anatomically and the loss of an anatomical lhb tendon may exacerbate any anterior instability.

Where's the confusion? Honestly I would be overjoyed if there was a reliable way of repairing the LHB tendon anatomically but it is not usually possible in part due to the pulley at the subscapularis tendon.

Dude, use paragraphs. Christ. Plus, writing all the technical wording means fcuk all. Stop trying to be a smart arse and break it down in layman’s terms. That’s all anyone needs or wants. Fcuking laughable. 

If you work in the field then  you would be able to do this. If you don’t work in the field why are you posting all the above?? You remind me of @daringhorse

In bold. Why would you be overjoyed? Genuine question. 
 

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2 hours ago, PSevens2017 said:

Dude, use paragraphs. Christ. Plus, writing all the technical wording means fcuk all. Stop trying to be a smart arse and break it down in layman’s terms. That’s all anyone needs or wants. Fcuking laughable. 

If you work in the field then  you would be able to do this. If you don’t work in the field why are you posting all the above?? You remind me of @daringhorse

In bold. Why would you be overjoyed? Genuine question. 
 

Umm there are 3 paragraphs there on my desktop screen. It's standard in blog writing etc to use up to 8 lines in a paragraph.

In my first post to the OP I did use laymans terms. I then answered his questions about my first post in laymans terms.

I used more specific technical descriptions and terms when you claimed I was confused about what the intended outcome of a LHB tendon reattachment is. It actually transpires that you were the one who was confused as you stated that people undergo the aforementioned surgery in order to treat anterior instability which is incorrect.

Restoration of anatomy is always a good thing if possible, perhaps being overjoyed at the prospect of anatomical LHB tendon reattachment isn't how I would feel but I think it would be a good development.

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2 minutes ago, charlysays said:

Umm there are 3 paragraphs there on my desktop screen. It's standard in blog writing etc to use up to 8 lines in a paragraph.

In my first post to the OP I did use laymans terms. I then answered his questions about my first post in laymans terms.

I used more specific technical descriptions and terms when you claimed I was confused about what the intended outcome of a LHB tendon reattachment is. It actually transpires that you were the one who was confused as you stated that people undergo the aforementioned surgery in order to treat anterior instability which is incorrect.

Restoration of anatomy is always a good thing if possible, perhaps being overjoyed at the prospect of anatomical LHB tendon reattachment isn't how I would feel but I think it would be a good development.

I’m not confused or incorrect. Go revise the operation and ‘surrounding structures’ meaning. 

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53 minutes ago, PSevens2017 said:

I’m not confused or incorrect. Go revise the operation and ‘surrounding structures’ meaning. 

I have. My statement was that loss of the anatomical LHB tendon can result in anterior shoulder instability as the LHB can provide some dynamic stabilisation to the front of the shoulder. Biceps tenodesis is the procedure which reattaches the LHB tendon outside of the shoulder joint. Whether this is done distally or proximally it is not reattached in its anatomical position to the superior labrum. As such it will not longer be able to assist in stabilising the shoulder and will only flex the elbow because it has literally been moved away from the joint and no longer traverses it. Biceps tenodesis does not address anterior shoulder instability. Can you link me a source which claims biceps tenodesis treats anterior instability?

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Thanks for replies guys

Abit of an update... completed my rest. The area is completely pain free now. Been using bands for stretches and did some light eccentrical loading curls.

Used a hammer massaging machine and got some massages.

waiting for physio/sports massage appointment. Local one to me is very busy.

shall I get back into my training with light waits. Or is it too soon?

 

 

 

 

 

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1 hour ago, Lovelyjubly said:

Thanks for replies guys

Abit of an update... completed my rest. The area is completely pain free now. Been using bands for stretches and did some light eccentrical loading curls.

Used a hammer massaging machine and got some massages.

waiting for physio/sports massage appointment. Local one to me is very busy.

shall I get back into my training with light waits. Or is it too soon?

 

 

 

 

 

Good work. Do you have full pain free range of motion? If it's only a couple of weeks til physio then I'd wait for that reasurrance from a pro who has tested the shoulder/ arm.

You could try a workout but just go very light to begin with if ROM is all good. like a third or even half the weight you'd usually use and really focus on form and posture. Take a day or two off after the session then see how your ROM is then start gradually building the reps or weight back up. Id build it up gradually over a few weeks to get back to the weights you were lifting.

Don't rush it. Plenty of time to lift weights when you're fully recovered, few weeks will make zero real difference in the long run.

In general a good way of not irritating the bicep tendon and other structures in the front of the shoulder is to never let your elbows move behind the plane of your rib cage when doing bench press etc. I usually press dumbells lying on the floor as it encourages good packing of the shoulder blades and stops excessive ROM. This may not be a significant issue for you if you are barrel Chested with short arms. I have long arms and not exactly barrel Chested so my shoulders end up in a compromising situation if I go for "full ROM" when pressing. For the purposes of hypertrophy, this slight limiting of ROM when pressing isn't really an issue but prevents a whole lot of injuries.

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On 17/05/2021 at 9:52 PM, charlysays said:

Good work. Do you have full pain free range of motion? If it's only a couple of weeks til physio then I'd wait for that reasurrance from a pro who has tested the shoulder/ arm.

You could try a workout but just go very light to begin with if ROM is all good. like a third or even half the weight you'd usually use and really focus on form and posture. Take a day or two off after the session then see how your ROM is then start gradually building the reps or weight back up. Id build it up gradually over a few weeks to get back to the weights you were lifting.

Don't rush it. Plenty of time to lift weights when you're fully recovered, few weeks will make zero real difference in the long run.

In general a good way of not irritating the bicep tendon and other structures in the front of the shoulder is to never let your elbows move behind the plane of your rib cage when doing bench press etc. I usually press dumbells lying on the floor as it encourages good packing of the shoulder blades and stops excessive ROM. This may not be a significant issue for you if you are barrel Chested with short arms. I have long arms and not exactly barrel Chested so my shoulders end up in a compromising situation if I go for "full ROM" when pressing. For the purposes of hypertrophy, this slight limiting of ROM when pressing isn't really an issue but prevents a whole lot of injuries.

Awsome for the reply thanks mate. 

Yeah im only doing very lights sets  atm. Which is ok for me. Gonna go abit abpit harder next week  onwards. Pain has totally gone. But ive rested if anything.  Done 1 full  upper body workout a couple of days ago. Didnt feel anything apart from shoulders abit stiff as i had rotator cuff injuries  not long ago.

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