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You need adequate recovery. You’ll know if you are overdoing it. Training each muscle group twice a week is generally considered optimal unless you do a bro split. Deloads are also essential but personally I just take a week off.

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I very much doubt 99% of people could actually over train.  Over reaching tho, that is essential.

The idea of it is probably holding alot of people back.  Take the deadlift for example, it's for some reason in bro code that it should only be trained once a week. Because they only train it once a week they think they have to go heavy every session 90%+. Then for some people they are knackered for days. So this fuels the myth further.  Also only once a week is potentially missing out on technique mastery which on its own is responsible for large increases in strength for intermediate lifters.

I did a 6 week block before Xmas where I deadlifted 5 days a week.  By doing this I'm honing my skillset and building resilience.  Obviously all at appropriate loads. Wednesday was technique triples at 55% for example.  At the end of it I got a PB.

Back to once a week currently but will be going back up to 3 times a week soon.

 

 

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On ‎06‎/‎04‎/‎2020 at 6:37 PM, DJAlpha said:

Is overtraining a thing?

Yes, but it'll be highly likely people are under recovering.

I cant stress the importance of adequate rest/ sleep. Also, if you can learn how to manage/ understand stress (cortisol and the lymphatic system) then this will go a long long way.

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it's definitely a thing. 

I had a job as a "despatch operative" in a food distribution site for a major manufacturer and distributer of food. 

I spent 12hrs in a chiller all day lifting boxes of bread based foods and stacking them onto a pallet. 

The boxes aren't that heavy they're from 1kg to 6.25kg though you lift more than 1 at a time so you'd really be doing 2 of those 6.25kg boxes at a time and trying to grab 6 to 9 of those 1kg ones in one go. 

You have to make around 40 pallets by the end of the day, each pallet around 250kg of these boxes, so you've personally lifted around 10,000kg by the end of the day. 

Also someone at that place used a GPS exercise tracker and it said he walked 30 miles over the 12hr shift. That's in safety boots. 

After  many of those 12hr shifts in a row your muscles just completely run out of glycogen and you're so much weaker. Very prone to injury like pulling neck and back muscles. My first day off I just slept for the whole day so it wasn't even a day off really it was wasted sleeping just to recover 

So also I wanted to workout, I did my workouts before work as after work my muscles didn't have much energy left. I tried once after work and I couldn't lift anywhere near as much so it was just really disappointing and I gave up and left the gym.  I started to workout before work, usual routine doing 5*5 in different lifts like squats, pull-ups, ohp. 

That started to make my performance suffer at work though, I got more tired lifting those boxes towards the end of the day. I didn't complete as many pallets as I did before. Also I was more prone to injury from doing things like throwing pallets around at work all day. I sometimes pulled my neck or shoulders. 

When I left that job after like a month of doing nothing, being lazy and sleeping, my body recovered and my strength was much better than it was whilst I was working in that job and going to the gym. 

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On 29/04/2020 at 11:56 AM, The Nolanator said:

it's definitely a thing. 

I had a job as a "despatch operative" in a food distribution site for a major manufacturer and distributer of food. 

I spent 12hrs in a chiller all day lifting boxes of bread based foods and stacking them onto a pallet. 

The boxes aren't that heavy they're from 1kg to 6.25kg though you lift more than 1 at a time so you'd really be doing 2 of those 6.25kg boxes at a time and trying to grab 6 to 9 of those 1kg ones in one go. 

You have to make around 40 pallets by the end of the day, each pallet around 250kg of these boxes, so you've personally lifted around 10,000kg by the end of the day. 

Also someone at that place used a GPS exercise tracker and it said he walked 30 miles over the 12hr shift. That's in safety boots. 

After  many of those 12hr shifts in a row your muscles just completely run out of glycogen and you're so much weaker. Very prone to injury like pulling neck and back muscles. My first day off I just slept for the whole day so it wasn't even a day off really it was wasted sleeping just to recover 

So also I wanted to workout, I did my workouts before work as after work my muscles didn't have much energy left. I tried once after work and I couldn't lift anywhere near as much so it was just really disappointing and I gave up and left the gym.  I started to workout before work, usual routine doing 5*5 in different lifts like squats, pull-ups, ohp. 

That started to make my performance suffer at work though, I got more tired lifting those boxes towards the end of the day. I didn't complete as many pallets as I did before. Also I was more prone to injury from doing things like throwing pallets around at work all day. I sometimes pulled my neck or shoulders. 

When I left that job after like a month of doing nothing, being lazy and sleeping, my body recovered and my strength was much better than it was whilst I was working in that job and going to the gym. 

I too have a very physical job. I have a very different way of looking at training though. 
I train after work. Although tired and weary, I make sure I’m fully fuelled. I have a good feed up 2 hours before training. I also eat a banana half hour before and a can of full fat coke and 200mg caffeine on my way to the gym. I’m definitely not as strong as I’d like, but I see that as muscle fatigue, I’m already half trained. Back at my best, 15st 15bf, I could still only bench 4 x 8-12 @ 120kg, pathetic for my size, but it works. Point is, I was lifting less but still getting huge gains all from fuelling my training to get all I could from it. 
To get back on tread, I have a week off every 6 weeks or so, I just feel It when it’s time. 

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18 minutes ago, Spieren said:

I too have a very physical job. I have a very different way of looking at training though. 
I train after work. Although tired and weary, I make sure I’m fully fuelled. I have a good feed up 2 hours before training. I also eat a banana half hour before and a can of full fat coke and 200mg caffeine on my way to the gym. I’m definitely not as strong as I’d like, but I see that as muscle fatigue, I’m already half trained. Back at my best, 15st 15bf, I could still only bench 4 x 8-12 @ 120kg, pathetic for my size, but it works. Point is, I was lifting less but still getting huge gains all from fuelling my training to get all I could from it. 
To get back on tread, I have a week off every 6 weeks or so, I just feel It when it’s time. 

I'm honestly not sure how that works out. I did the same, went to the gym after a 12hr shift of lifting boxes and tried overhead press. I wanted to do 5*5 what I usually do and I kept it at a weight I knew would be easyish for me on a normal day, but I got 4 reps on the first set failed the 5th then my arms were like jelly, I was so tired and out of breath too, I just wanted to sit down and sleep. 

 

I was so disheartened and didn't want to lower the weight to less than what I could normally easily lift. I thought what's the point as I want to follow progressive overload and keep adding weight. 

 

so then I just went home lol. 

 

but maybe you are right maybe you can train at a lower weight after a hard day's work and still see progress (like subtract 10-25% on a work day) I'm not sure. I know 12hrs lifting boxes is just completely the wrong type of training it's doing endurance and messing with 5*5 style training so I felt it wasn't a benefit of preexhausting the muscles but it was holding me back and I hated that feeling 

 

so after that experience I decided to always work out before work to at least get a better quality workout in. 

 

I'm so happy now I don't do that job anymore. my strength went up loads after quitting that job 

 

but if you can do it that's really cool and good determination on your part. 

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You could be right @The Nolanator  I could be wrong. The truth is I only found out it works for me because I just couldn’t train then do my job (Plasterer) It’s all in the feed up, plus dragging my sorry ass to the gym when every one of my 6 senses is saying go home :lol:

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