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Hey guys. 

 

This is a random one, I am somewhere on the spectrum as I'm diagnosed with ASD. Just wondering if anyone else here has that, or anything else similar?

 

For me training and the PEDs seem to be the only thing that help me cope. 

 

Anyone else? 

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Yep, I was diagnosed as quite severe in my mid thirties.

I don't really think of it as a 'condition', it's just a trait. Most relationship break ups I know, the female side accuses the male of being "on the spectrum".

It certainly accounts for focus and commitment. Sticking to a training regime or a diet is easy to me, and I don't understand how others slip up, cheat, etc.

I struggle with any conversations relating to emotions. Even somebody just asking me how I feel can send me into a spiral of confusion, which can often result in me becoming defensive or upset.

Most people are pretty shocked when they learn I'm an arse burger. When I want to be, I can be charming and engaging, but I'm just following a programme which I learned, so it makes me feel like a fraud.

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Asperger's here :thumbup1:

Asperger's is considered a more mild form of autism. It's mostly high functioning, most people wouldn't know you have it unless you told them because you tend to attempt to avoid drawing attention to it.

It does affect my life a lot, though. I do get really set in my ways and struggle with change. I don't cope well with stress. I enjoy social activity but also find it exhausting. I get obsessed with things to the point where my priorities get f**ked up and I spend unholy amounts of time on things that aren't really important. Like that T3 FAQ I wrote, which was born of me becoming fascinated with how the drug worked and how the thyroid gland worked and could be manipulated - a year of reading for hours every day, hounding numerous people for their experiences, taking risks with own body just because I needed to know what would happen if I did this or that and couldn't find enough information or anecdotes, and it all has to culminate in me doing something with all that time I've spent so I don't feel like it was a grand waste of time.

I also tend to rotate my obsessions, my desire to spend lots of my free time on one thing will fizzle out and something I lost interest in a few years ago will pique my interest once again and start to consume a lot of my life. I might even have two different things on the go and feel uneasy when I start spending more time on one than I do the other.

I tried cognitive behavioural therapy for it once to see if I could live a bit more of a normal life, but from what I've read, it generally doesn't work and it didn't with me. I just learned to accept that having something to obsess over actually keeps me feeling like I've got something to live for. Other areas of my life do suffer sometimes and that's something I do continue to work on, often have to reason to myself that if I just crack on and do that thing that needs doing then I can get back to my activity and feel more at ease knowing I don't really need to be doing something else. 

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4 hours ago, nWo said:

Asperger's here :thumbup1:

Asperger's is considered a more mild form of autism. It's mostly high functioning, most people wouldn't know you have it unless you told them because you tend to attempt to avoid drawing attention to it.

It does affect my life a lot, though. I do get really set in my ways and struggle with change. I don't cope well with stress. I enjoy social activity but also find it exhausting. I get obsessed with things to the point where my priorities get f**ked up and I spend unholy amounts of time on things that aren't really important. Like that T3 FAQ I wrote, which was born of me becoming fascinated with how the drug worked and how the thyroid gland worked and could be manipulated - a year of reading for hours every day, hounding numerous people for their experiences, taking risks with own body just because I needed to know what would happen if I did this or that and couldn't find enough information or anecdotes, and it all has to culminate in me doing something with all that time I've spent so I don't feel like it was a grand waste of time.

I also tend to rotate my obsessions, my desire to spend lots of my free time on one thing will fizzle out and something I lost interest in a few years ago will pique my interest once again and start to consume a lot of my life. I might even have two different things on the go and feel uneasy when I start spending more time on one than I do the other.

I tried cognitive behavioural therapy for it once to see if I could live a bit more of a normal life, but from what I've read, it generally doesn't work and it didn't with me. I just learned to accept that having something to obsess over actually keeps me feeling like I've got something to live for. Other areas of my life do suffer sometimes and that's something I do continue to work on, often have to reason to myself that if I just crack on and do that thing that needs doing then I can get back to my activity and feel more at ease knowing I don't really need to be doing something else. 

Sounds like me on the most part. I have met people with aspergers and I thought it was like talking to a robot so never considered myself anything close to aspergers

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8 hours ago, Stinking Dylan said:

Yep, I was diagnosed as quite severe in my mid thirties.

I don't really think of it as a 'condition', it's just a trait. Most relationship break ups I know, the female side accuses the male of being "on the spectrum".

It certainly accounts for focus and commitment. Sticking to a training regime or a diet is easy to me, and I don't understand how others slip up, cheat, etc.

I struggle with any conversations relating to emotions. Even somebody just asking me how I feel can send me into a spiral of confusion, which can often result in me becoming defensive or upset.

Most people are pretty shocked when they learn I'm an arse burger. When I want to be, I can be charming and engaging, but I'm just following a programme which I learned, so it makes me feel like a fraud.

That sounds really late for a diagnosis mate, had you or your parents ever had any suspicions earlier on in your life? What made you go for a medical assessment? 

7 hours ago, nWo said:

Asperger's here :thumbup1:

Asperger's is considered a more mild form of autism. It's mostly high functioning, most people wouldn't know you have it unless you told them because you tend to attempt to avoid drawing attention to it.

It does affect my life a lot, though. I do get really set in my ways and struggle with change. I don't cope well with stress. I enjoy social activity but also find it exhausting. I get obsessed with things to the point where my priorities get f**ked up and I spend unholy amounts of time on things that aren't really important. Like that T3 FAQ I wrote, which was born of me becoming fascinated with how the drug worked and how the thyroid gland worked and could be manipulated - a year of reading for hours every day, hounding numerous people for their experiences, taking risks with own body just because I needed to know what would happen if I did this or that and couldn't find enough information or anecdotes, and it all has to culminate in me doing something with all that time I've spent so I don't feel like it was a grand waste of time.

I also tend to rotate my obsessions, my desire to spend lots of my free time on one thing will fizzle out and something I lost interest in a few years ago will pique my interest once again and start to consume a lot of my life. I might even have two different things on the go and feel uneasy when I start spending more time on one than I do the other.

I tried cognitive behavioural therapy for it once to see if I could live a bit more of a normal life, but from what I've read, it generally doesn't work and it didn't with me. I just learned to accept that having something to obsess over actually keeps me feeling like I've got something to live for. Other areas of my life do suffer sometimes and that's something I do continue to work on, often have to reason to myself that if I just crack on and do that thing that needs doing then I can get back to my activity and feel more at ease knowing I don't really need to be doing something else. 

Do you reckon that's why you've done so well with the physique? A friend of mine has Asperger's and has done really well for himself (he's a movie SFX guy). He doesn't really understand human interaction in general, really confuses him and stresses him out - but put him in front of a PC and it's like watching one machine use another. He was offered a job in the states which you'd think would be an amazing experience.. ended up having 5 or 6 panic attacks a day just thinking about the change, poor fucker. 

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I think OCD and autistic traits are shown in many athletes. The preparation, the obsession, attention to every little detail are often signs. I also work in IT which again means I see the same types of individual. I'm definitely on the spectrum somewhere, but no idea to what level. It doesn't tend to cause me any issues as I'm acutely aware of the areas it affects me, both positively and negatively.  

My ex's eldest was going through being diagnosed and no one in their family could really understand his personality, which was a huge shame, but I saw a lot of myself in his behaviour. 

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For me it's OCD.

What annoys me is that it is trivialised a lot by people, who say  things like"I like a tidy house, I think I've got a bit if OCD" 

The reality of having proper OCD is like living in your own self imposed prison in your head that you can't escape.  Some days are just plain exhausting. 

I wouldn't wish it on anybody. 

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6 hours ago, jake87 said:

Sounds like me on the most part. I have met people with aspergers and I thought it was like talking to a robot so never considered myself anything close to aspergers

 

5 hours ago, Cronus said:

I thought aspergers was inability or lack of to socialise, like being very introvert? 

Nah, with just Asperger's as I said, you probably wouldn't know there's anything wrong with them just by talking to them. Whenever I've told people I've got Asperger's and explained it's an autistic spectrum disorder, the response is always the same - "but you seem really normal?". If they're unable to socialise or robotic then they're much higher on the autistic spectrum. Numerous famous actors with Asperger's that you wouldn't know had it unless you've been told. Robin Williams, for example, or Dan Aykrod from Ghostbusters. Both highly animated, charismatic and witty men.

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2 hours ago, Ares said:

That sounds really late for a diagnosis mate, had you or your parents ever had any suspicions earlier on in your life? What made you go for a medical assessment? 

Do you reckon that's why you've done so well with the physique? A friend of mine has Asperger's and has done really well for himself (he's a movie SFX guy). He doesn't really understand human interaction in general, really confuses him and stresses him out - but put him in front of a PC and it's like watching one machine use another. He was offered a job in the states which you'd think would be an amazing experience.. ended up having 5 or 6 panic attacks a day just thinking about the change, poor fucker. 

I had a really late diagnosis as well, wasn't diagnosed till I was 24! My parents didn't know anything about the conditions at all, my mum just always wondered why I used to get so obsessive about my hobbies.

I'd say so, especially in the first year or two I read everything I could get my hands on in regards to training, dieting etc. The extreme majority of people make a lot of mistakes in the first few years of their training, whereas even looking back now I can't see much I was doing wrong even from day 1.

Yeah, can imagine I'd be the same about moving abroad away from my family and friends lol, unimaginable to me.

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22 hours ago, Stinking Dylan said:

Yep, I was diagnosed as quite severe in my mid thirties.

I don't really think of it as a 'condition', it's just a trait. Most relationship break ups I know, the female side accuses the male of being "on the spectrum".

It certainly accounts for focus and commitment. Sticking to a training regime or a diet is easy to me, and I don't understand how others slip up, cheat, etc.

I struggle with any conversations relating to emotions. Even somebody just asking me how I feel can send me into a spiral of confusion, which can often result in me becoming defensive or upset.

Most people are pretty shocked when they learn I'm an arse burger. When I want to be, I can be charming and engaging, but I'm just following a programme which I learned, so it makes me feel like a fraud.

Yeah I'm the same, followed ASTs Max OT the past year now haha. But I guess everyone is a fraud since the first ever bodybuilder bro haha. It's like everyone learns from someone haha

 

Yeah I can't deal with my parents in my life, even the thought of contact makes me feel like I'm gonna have an aggressive violent meltdown or something. Been good since on gear and training tho. Before bodybuilding I'd be smashing stuff regularly. Getting overwhelmed easily. Now it's like I have a focus, and everything else is trivial, not worth letting anything get in the way of my eating and gym. 

 

Yeah autism sucks, but with the bodybuilding it's like a weird cure or something. I guess meditation maybe, like you said, pure focus, if you're overloading the muslce, you're thinking of nothing else haha

 

21 hours ago, nWo said:

Asperger's here :thumbup1:

Asperger's is considered a more mild form of autism. It's mostly high functioning, most people wouldn't know you have it unless you told them because you tend to attempt to avoid drawing attention to it.

It does affect my life a lot, though. I do get really set in my ways and struggle with change. I don't cope well with stress. I enjoy social activity but also find it exhausting. I get obsessed with things to the point where my priorities get f**ked up and I spend unholy amounts of time on things that aren't really important. Like that T3 FAQ I wrote, which was born of me becoming fascinated with how the drug worked and how the thyroid gland worked and could be manipulated - a year of reading for hours every day, hounding numerous people for their experiences, taking risks with own body just because I needed to know what would happen if I did this or that and couldn't find enough information or anecdotes, and it all has to culminate in me doing something with all that time I've spent so I don't feel like it was a grand waste of time.

I also tend to rotate my obsessions, my desire to spend lots of my free time on one thing will fizzle out and something I lost interest in a few years ago will pique my interest once again and start to consume a lot of my life. I might even have two different things on the go and feel uneasy when I start spending more time on one than I do the other.

I tried cognitive behavioural therapy for it once to see if I could live a bit more of a normal life, but from what I've read, it generally doesn't work and it didn't with me. I just learned to accept that having something to obsess over actually keeps me feeling like I've got something to live for. Other areas of my life do suffer sometimes and that's something I do continue to work on, often have to reason to myself that if I just crack on and do that thing that needs doing then I can get back to my activity and feel more at ease knowing I don't really need to be doing something else. 

Wow, it's nice to see I'm not alone. Yeah the I got obsessed with thyroid stuff, but mainly iodine haha currently I'm on panganism and old school religions since breaking from Christianity after s life time.. yeah I go through those phases too, where you just learn everything there is to know about something, usually totally irrelevant stuff, like nuclear bunkers or something lmao

 

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@Stinking Dylan @nWo   I’m so glad I’ve come across this thread!! This is going to sound stupid but you guys sound just like me! I knew I wasn’t the only one like that of course, but seeing others write it down like that...i was diagnosed with Aspergers and OCD 3 years ago. It was good to have a name to put to why I am like I am but f**k is it Exausting. Having to try and have emotions like empathy sympathy.. they don’t exist to me, don’t want to go into to much info but my dad killed him self in April, and there were no tears, not thoughts no sadness nothing. My training has been beyond lacklustre this past 4months but I’m hoping to get back to the commited side I know I have. Hopefully starting a cycle for the first time won’t have any negative affects towards me. 

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Reading this I wonder if I'm on the spectrum as well. I find dealing with people really hard. Not in the sense that I'm afraid, but I just don't want anything to do with anybody which makes it hard in my job as I have a very senior position. I don't trust people at all which is why I have written people off very close to me without a second thought if they've hurt me in some way. I have this belief that if I trust someone, I would do anything for them without question and I would never do anything to hurt them no matter what. Through life though it seems people don't see it the same way and one way or another I've always been f*cked by the people closest to me. So now I just concentrate on my wife and daughter as they're the only people left I care about. 

Makes it a lot easier knowing I don't have anyone else to please.

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On 19/11/2019 at 9:31 AM, nWo said:

Asperger's here :thumbup1:

Asperger's is considered a more mild form of autism. It's mostly high functioning, most people wouldn't know you have it unless you told them because you tend to attempt to avoid drawing attention to it.

It does affect my life a lot, though. I do get really set in my ways and struggle with change. I don't cope well with stress. I enjoy social activity but also find it exhausting. I get obsessed with things to the point where my priorities get f**ked up and I spend unholy amounts of time on things that aren't really important. Like that T3 FAQ I wrote, which was born of me becoming fascinated with how the drug worked and how the thyroid gland worked and could be manipulated - a year of reading for hours every day, hounding numerous people for their experiences, taking risks with own body just because I needed to know what would happen if I did this or that and couldn't find enough information or anecdotes, and it all has to culminate in me doing something with all that time I've spent so I don't feel like it was a grand waste of time.

I also tend to rotate my obsessions, my desire to spend lots of my free time on one thing will fizzle out and something I lost interest in a few years ago will pique my interest once again and start to consume a lot of my life. I might even have two different things on the go and feel uneasy when I start spending more time on one than I do the other.

I tried cognitive behavioural therapy for it once to see if I could live a bit more of a normal life, but from what I've read, it generally doesn't work and it didn't with me. I just learned to accept that having something to obsess over actually keeps me feeling like I've got something to live for. Other areas of my life do suffer sometimes and that's something I do continue to work on, often have to reason to myself that if I just crack on and do that thing that needs doing then I can get back to my activity and feel more at ease knowing I don't really need to be doing something else. 

Sounds identical to me, NWO! 

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On 19/11/2019 at 8:04 PM, nWo said:

 

Nah, with just Asperger's as I said, you probably wouldn't know there's anything wrong with them just by talking to them. Whenever I've told people I've got Asperger's and explained it's an autistic spectrum disorder, the response is always the same - "but you seem really normal?". If they're unable to socialise or robotic then they're much higher on the autistic spectrum. Numerous famous actors with Asperger's that you wouldn't know had it unless you've been told. Robin Williams, for example, or Dan Aykrod from Ghostbusters. Both highly animated, charismatic and witty men.

My sister in laws eldest son has Aspergers. Some days it is very obvious; he's distant, socially awkward, a bit 'odd' in general. Plus he tends to have this facial expression I would classify as strange, he would standout in a crowd.

Other days, though, he's like any other 16 year old. Unless you knew he had Aspergers, you wouldn't necessarily notice anything different about him.

He's very obsessive about things, and when he gets down about something it can take him a while to get over it. He gets bullied which doesnt help. 

I imagine there are many people out there who have it but who don't know it yet.

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Just an update, since I've been practicing Transcendental Meditation, my symptoms of autism have kinda disappeared. ;-)

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