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TALBOTL

Strongest Natural

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I know this will open the comedy box and I await the usual UKM well thought out and constructive comments that I know and love, if (when) it gets derailed all will be well anyway as it's Friday afternoon which is primetime for the jokers such as myself. 

On a serious note though (is that a thing anymore?) who is the strongest natural on here or that you know/train with, I'm just intrigued to get a rough idea of where I am really, I do use strengthlevel.com which is quite useful to a point but you never know the calibre of people adding the data or indeed whether they are accurate at all. Can also double up as thread for us naturals to shine. 

 

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Moved to correct section.

As an on topic side note I feel steroids do far more for hypertrophy than they do strength despite strength and hypertrophy being largely unanimous

To see an extreme example of this compare the enhanced vs natural powerlifting records and then open class bodybuilding enhanced vs natural 

Drastic difference in the bodybuilding and not so much in the powerlifting

And ftr I don't believe the elite level natural PLs are actually nature they're just not getting caught which still has meaning when compared to enhanced that have carte blanche to run all they want for as long as they want and taper their dosages and compounds into competition 

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Recently I feel as though my strength has been increasing significantly just due to mental strength as much as anything, as I prefer the feeling of getting to and beating certain weights especially on compound exercises as opposed to looking a bit better in the mirror, in fact I'd argue granted it's an individual thing that using more strongman/compound work is more rewarding for any natural as you still get the buzz and satisfaction of increasing your weights where as from looking in the mirror the changes are a lot more difficult to achieve without AAS - if that makes sense?

I'm obviously not at any kind of level to compete as of yet nor, but the more I think about it I definitely feel I have the mindset to take my training more down the powerlifting route, I'm not talking WSM but just a heavier balance towards compound and lower rep work - but realistically I don't want to use AAS for a while yet which I know will hinder me from doing well in competition (although not personally nor will it be used as an excuse) 

Goal is to get to 400kg leg press and 250kg deadlift (for 4-5 reps) by my 29th birthday which is next May, I'm confident of both if I remain injury free. 

 

 

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5 minutes ago, TALBOTL said:

Recently I feel as though my strength has been increasing significantly just due to mental strength as much as anything, as I prefer the feeling of getting to and beating certain weights especially on compound exercises as opposed to looking a bit better in the mirror, in fact I'd argue granted it's an individual thing that using more strongman/compound work is more rewarding for any natural as you still get the buzz and satisfaction of increasing your weights where as from looking in the mirror the changes are a lot more difficult to achieve without AAS - if that makes sense?

I'm obviously not at any kind of level to compete as of yet nor, but the more I think about it I definitely feel I have the mindset to take my training more down the powerlifting route, I'm not talking WSM but just a heavier balance towards compound and lower rep work - but realistically I don't want to use AAS for a while yet which I know will hinder me from doing well in competition (although not personally nor will it be used as an excuse) 

Goal is to get to 400kg leg press and 250kg deadlift (for 4-5 reps) by my 29th birthday which is next May, I'm confident of both if I remain injury free. 

 

 

you can always compare your stats to previous years 

https://www.britishpowerlifting.org/


and make a decision if you feel youre at a stage you are happy to compete at 

 

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3 minutes ago, swole troll said:

you can always compare your stats to previous years 

https://www.britishpowerlifting.org/


and make a decision if you feel youre at a stage you are happy to compete at 

 

Probably a stupid question..

Are these single reps or max reps at a set weight?

Either way it looks like I could compete in a couple of years realistically even remaining natural, whether I would is another question though

 

715_british_equipped_championships_r3.pdf

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56 minutes ago, TALBOTL said:

Probably a stupid question..

Are these single reps or max reps at a set weight?

Either way it looks like I could compete in a couple of years realistically even remaining natural, whether I would is another question though

 

715_british_equipped_championships_r3.pdf

That's equipped 

Assuming you are going to compete raw (without wraps, bench shirts, deadlift and squat suits) you want the raw numbers which is simply a belt and knee sleeves 

The sport of powerlifting consists of three attempts of a single rep at the squat bench and deadlift, the heaviest weight of each lift is taken and combined to make your total which is compared against the others in your weight class 

For instance 

Squat first attempt: 1 rep at 240kg

Second attempt 1x 250kg 

Third attempt 1x260kg but failed to make the lift 

 

Your heaviest squat was 250kg so that is added to your total 

The same is done with bench, you perform 1 rep, 3 times (rest is typically 10min + between attempts) and the heaviest weight is added to your total 

Bench attempts 

1: 150kg

2: 160kg 

3: 170kg 

170kg was your heaviest successful attempt so that is added to your heaviest successful squat attempt of 250kg which when combined to your bench press makes 420kg, this is your total so far 

Then the same again with deadlifts

There is rules with dropping down weight and bombing out but that's the gist

Youll have to Google the rest if interested 

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1 minute ago, swole troll said:

That's equipped 

Assuming you are going to compete raw (without wraps, bench shirts, deadlift and squat suits) you want the raw numbers which is simply a belt and knee sleeves 

The sport of powerlifting consists of three attempts of a single rep at the squat bench and deadlift, the heaviest weight of each lift is taken and combined to make your total which is compared against the others in your weight class 

For instance 

Squat first attempt: 1 rep at 240kg

Second attempt 1x 250kg 

Third attempt 1x260kg but failed to make the lift 

 

Your heaviest squat was 250kg so that is added to your total 

The same is done with bench, you perform 1 rep, 3 times (rest is typically 10min + between attempts) and the heaviest weight is added to your total 

Bench attempts 

1: 150kg

2: 160kg 

3: 170kg 

170kg was your heaviest successful attempt so that is added to your heaviest successful squat attempt of 250kg which when combined to your bench press makes 420kg, this is your total so far 

Then the same again with deadlifts

There is rules with dropping down weight and bombing out but that's the gist

Youll have to Google the rest if interested 

Perfect thanks ST, as said still a bit off some of the lifts but not a million miles away on others. 

I'd say 500 would be my 5x5 PB's together, might be interesting to have a look in to it - so thanks as ever for your guidance :) 

LT

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1 hour ago, TALBOTL said:

Perfect thanks ST, as said still a bit off some of the lifts but not a million miles away on others. 

I'd say 500 would be my 5x5 PB's together, might be interesting to have a look in to it - so thanks as ever for your guidance :) 

LT

no idea what your 1 rep maxes are? the totals needed to compete aren't really that high

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3 minutes ago, JLawson90 said:

no idea what your 1 rep maxes are? the totals needed to compete aren't really that high

I'm 91kg and 6ft2 which doesn't make things easy for me, at a guess: 

230kg 1 rep max deadlift, squat possibly 190-200kg and bench would let me down as I'd say 130-140kg - certainly couldn't compete right now with those lifts at my body weight. 

That's pure guess though and untrained etc. so who knows but I haven't focused on that kind of lifting for around 2 years now. 

 

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11 minutes ago, TALBOTL said:

I'm 91kg and 6ft2 which doesn't make things easy for me, at a guess: 

230kg 1 rep max deadlift, squat possibly 190-200kg and bench would let me down as I'd say 130-140kg - certainly couldn't compete right now with those lifts at my body weight. 

That's pure guess though and untrained etc. so who knows but I haven't focused on that kind of lifting for around 2 years now. 

 

what you have to remember is that is a british championship level .. you are perfectly capable of competing at a lower standard to gain experience, which could be very valuable, I say go for it mate .. you're not THAT far off the 93kg weight class totals to be fair, your deadlift is lagging a bit though

for comparison, i'm 95kg, 5 ft 8 .. I'd say my 1RM at current are 200 squat, 125 bench, 255 deadlift .. which is what 580kg, the qualifying totals for the EQUIPPED one is 680 .. so whilst being equipped might not add 100kg, I wouldnt be far away and I've never trained powerlifting, just strongman

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Purely guesses there, I might have a go next week and see where I am for definite - I’ve seen a few charity events locally which look good fun - we shall see! 

Good luck with your comps, it’s nice to see people going down the strength route. 

 

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A ) youre looking at the British champs not regional qualifier numbers (big difference)

B ) the only requirement to compete in regard to weights is that you are able to squat, bench and deadlift an empty barbell 

Most there arnt there to win but instead just to better their own numbers under official and tracked circumstance 

The atmosphere, the people you meet, the buzz of the crowd make attempting personal bests and 1rms  a world apart from attempting them anywhere else 

Plus it's just a good crack, the adrenalin usually makes for a level of strength that will surprise you and you're spending time with a bunch of like minded people all their spurring you on 

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Agree with swole. Most of the people I chat to hold back from competing due to them not feeling ready.

Granted, a meet is a bit more intimidating than say a race. You're not an individual in a crowd of 500 runners, and being judged in front of an audience...

But the support of everybody is great. Even total beginners compete at local events, at all ages. Meets occasionally get cancelled because they simply can't make up the numbers, so any new faces are always warmly welcomed.

I'm useless at it, but still love competing in the skinny old weakling class! :D

 

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21 minutes ago, Jackoffblades said:

I used to be strong as a natural but these days I’m no where near where I used to be. I’m sure once you reach your 30s it’s game over 

quite the opposite 

agility, speed and endurance are the first performance based attributes to fade with strength being much later on 

typically a male should be peaking in strength around their 30s-40

and before anyone says well what about Larry Wheels and Eric Lilliebridge if this is the case how strong will they be by their 30s and 40s 
well injury is often the downfall for these early bloomers 

but for your average Joe (particularly natural), if they train smart they should continue to make strength gains into their mid to late thirties 
again injury permitting 

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4 minutes ago, swole troll said:

quite the opposite 

agility, speed and endurance are the first performance based attributes to fade with strength being much later on 

typically a male should be peaking in strength around their 30s-40

and before anyone says well what about Larry Wheels and Eric Lilliebridge if this is the case how strong will they be by their 30s and 40s 
well injury is often the downfall for these early bloomers 

but for your average Joe (particularly natural), if they train smart they should continue to make strength gains into their mid to late thirties 
again injury permitting 

I don’t know what’s happening with me then lol. 

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1 minute ago, Jackoffblades said:

I don’t know what’s happening with me then lol. 

there will exceptions to the rule 

but your recovery will generally get worse as you age so perhaps you are trying to push as though you are in your early 20s with volume, frequency and or intensity and you are simply not recovering enough to make progress 

take a look at WSM, generally they are in their mid 30s, Eddie and Thor have been exceptions 

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22 hours ago, Jackoffblades said:

I don’t know what’s happening with me then lol. 

Lifting heavy weights is largely in the mind. You have to believe you can lift the weight because if you don't believe you can lift it you won't.

Strength is one of the last things to fade. I'm pushing towards 60 and could still post a natty 550 total.

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This what I feel now that I’m 32. When I was say 27 it would take 3500 calories a day to have a 150kg bench, 4000 plus calories to get say 160 or 165 bench, and around 5000 calories to get up to 180kg bench and it would be around 4000 calories where I would start to put on fat. These days now I’m 32 it takes 4000 calories to get a 150 bench and I start to put on fat just by having more than 3000 calories a day even though I’m very active with a busy job so I never really go past 4000 calories a day because the fat to reward ratio just isn’t worth it 

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On 29/12/2019 at 11:59 AM, swole troll said:

quite the opposite 

agility, speed and endurance are the first performance based attributes to fade with strength being much later on 

typically a male should be peaking in strength around their 30s-40

and before anyone says well what about Larry Wheels and Eric Lilliebridge if this is the case how strong will they be by their 30s and 40s 
well injury is often the downfall for these early bloomers 

but for your average Joe (particularly natural), if they train smart they should continue to make strength gains into their mid to late thirties 
again injury permitting 

Im really counting on this lol 34 this year got to have a little strength left in me 

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