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Fadi

Music: the psychophysical effects it has on you...

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Coming from a world that heard nothing but the slamming of a loaded bar onto a wooden platform, it was most certainly a shock of sort to find music glaring throughout the gym back in 1984, when I made the switch from the world of Olympic weightlifting, to that of bodybuilding. In the initial stages, it took some effort on my part to zone out of this "noisy environment", whilst going deep into my own little world of silence, where only the weights and I existed in that new world.

Today, scientists tell us that the vast majority of gym goers listen to music whilst training.  By "music", I'm referring to your own personal music that you've chosen over and above what is usually provided at your local gym.

Why do we do it?

It seems that many benefits can be derived by listening; benefits such as a reduction in perceived exertion (caffeine comes to mind here), an improvement in mood status, an increase in your state of arousal, and an overall reduction in the feeling of anxiety (where you feel like you can conquer the world). Unfortunately, scientists have not yet established whether the above benefits apply to a maximum explosive effort, as is the case in Olympic weightlifting (something I can attest to). There's a huge difference between simply training really heavy, and that critical moment when you're going for an all out max rep..., where 110% full concentration is required. I must say (watching the Arnold strong man), there I heard plenty of screaming and shouting as a tool of encouragement when a lifter is (say) deadlifting a monstrous weight off of the platform..., so perhaps the more experienced powerlifters/strength athletes on UK-M can fill me in on that one.

So based on one of the studies (that I'd be sharing with you below), it seems that no change in peak power output or movement velocity is achieved with music. However as for bodybuilding/resistance type of training, music seems  to increase repetitions to failure in sets at low and moderate intensities. This is great news for the bodybuilder who's focus is not on killing it with some crazy high intensity (a la strength dominated sports), but who's main interest is muscle hypertrophy; listening to music, especially your own, can do wonders in improving your workout performance. 

Finally, most listen for the enjoyment, as this aspect makes the whole gym event that much more pleasurable , and what we perceive to be pleasant and pleasurable , we usually continue to do; be more consistent at doing, leading to consistency overall..., can’t beat it!

For Me: even after years of training, what does it for me has nothing to do with sound and all to do with smell. The Olympic weightlifting squad I belonged to back in the early 80s, used that Metsal rub (it smells a lot like Deep-Heat). This smell goes right into my brain, activating and waking up whatever is half asleep inside there!

For You? Please do share what does it for you..., easy classical type of music, or heavy metal, or somewhere in between? Maybe it's neither sound nor smell for you, but sight, as in some good looking female you may like to impress etc. We're all different, and different things make us tick, or tick us off ...

https://search.proquest.com/openview/f4896bb1ba4f99483f330363a1a4a475/1?pq-origsite=gscholar&cbl=30153

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1469029217306751

Thanks for reading.

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I started training with headphones about a year ago and I feel it makes a difference to me. I tend to go into beast mode if Im listening to something pretty aggressive. I stick playlists on shuffle and I tend to go for it more if something like Rage against the machine starts playing. Oh and I like film scores too and will time reps sometimes to particular rousing moments in a a piece, gives me goosebumps.

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I don't listen to music once I'm in the gym. Truth be told they've always got decent House music in the gym which I like anyway. I do however listen to music in the car on the way to the gym, which is a few minutes drive from my house so it's always just the one song :lol: What I listen to depends. Some days I feel like I need a bit more aggression, I'll listen to something like Drill or Metal. Other days I just feel like I need a lift and might listen to some Trance or House just to improve my mood and get the blood pumping. Those are my go-to's.

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@Fadi

I’ve only just ventured into here after not reading in here for so long as it’s a section that very few people are interested in, most on here are most interested in which drug will fire them to a new level whereas I’ve always been a huge believer that it all starts with the right frame of mind, a state of positivity. 

I don’t use music, total silence I’d prefer as I block out all distractions as I go into my lift(s) unless it’s higher reps in which case I’ll psyche myself up as I am repping, for example if going for 15 reps max, by 8 I’ll be 60% up on psyche and so on. If that goes really well, I might get lucky and get that euphoria pushing me into 13 where I feel nothing but ease, I almost laugh at the weights and sometimes can push as far as 20 reps but most likely 18, just depends on that zoning.  I’ve even had this on 1RM where it just feels so much easier, usually on Clean + press(I don’t jerk). 

Enroute to the gym, I feel my heart rate raise by quite a bit, it’s almost like I fear it but I go face it. 

Strangely, I like many dangerous things in life but not drugs, things such as motorbikes(road and off road), driving, martial arts(heavy sparring), etc etc. 

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