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rsd147

Lower back!!!

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So about 4 weeks ago I suffered a back problem, not sure how I did it, am guessing squats and deadlifts over time as I do both twice a week heavish. Went to my GP over two weeks ago who said it was the sacroiliac joint. He gave me naproxen and told me to avoid any lower body work.

Since then I have been seeing a physio I know who is 99% sure it is a lower lumbar disc problem (bulging disc). He has given me some stretches to do and often manipulates it to try and open up the disc. Just wondered how long this type of injury takes to heal? Its frustrating me so much that I cannot do any lower body work and it sort of feels like its getting better but still aches constantly especially now my naproxen has finished.

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I had a prolapsed disc a few years ago... can't remember the exact time table, but think she had me back in the gym quicker than I would have done myself... think it was 4 weeks before doing light stuff and 8-10 to start pushing it again. Obviously will vary from injury to injury though... bit like asking how long for a cut to heal.

You will need to be careful in future as it will probably always be prone to going again.

Tight hamstrings by any chance?

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4 hours ago, 2004mark said:

I had a prolapsed disc a few years ago... can't remember the exact time table, but think she had me back in the gym quicker than I would have done myself... think it was 4 weeks before doing light stuff and 8-10 to start pushing it again. Obviously will vary from injury to injury though... bit like asking how long for a cut to heal.

You will need to be careful in future as it will probably always be prone to going again.

Tight hamstrings by any chance?

Yes tight hamstrings why?

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don't ignore that sh#t dude. I have 3 severe prolapsed disks in my back and the bones have become offset over time. Due to bad lifting in my early 20s and 20 years later I feel it every day of my life, some days can hardly walk, sciatic pain goes right down into both feet I have no S curve in my lower spine, practically straight

drugs only mask the problem. 

Primary reason why it gets worse then better is: lack of stretching, I stretch for a while every day get lazy, quit and comes back 

What helps a lot: stretch hamstrings, lie on the floor leg up against the door frame. Lying of the floor keeps the hip bone flat, if sciatic hurting, put a bend in the knee. Easy to do, just start into space. stretch the glutes  and truck too, loads of exercises on line 

A strong core will help a lot as it squashes everything back in  

As for gym, I can't do a squat ever so leg press is the way to go , no direct vertical through the spinal column, but easy into it and easy off the machine after you're done. If you are getting sciatic pain in the leg the disk has already prolapsed so you need to stop doing whatever it is that's causing it 

For example: seated hamstring is fine for me, lying face down is a real killer. Heavy weights can throw form right out so you can do more reps and still build muscle 

I really recommend a chiropractor, spinal manipulation is excellent but you must follow up with stretching and light rotational movement, can be just rotating truck around 

 

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On 03/14/2017 at 3:40 PM, rsd147 said:

Yes tight hamstrings why?

It limits the range of hip angles over which you can maintain a neutral spine. Once you reach the maximum length your hamstrings can stretch to your lower back will start to round, increasing the risk of injury. You want to limit your range of motion to not exceed this point.

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