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SimpleLimit

Pain in my knees after a leg day

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So after a leg day (5-6 hours after), I can feel a pain in my knees when I try to stand up after sitting down,

 

I believe it might be related to doing Leg extensions and Leg curls but I am not sure, any ideas how to deal with this ?

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Personally I've never found a way. My knees might as well be dry bone by now. The only leg exercise that doesn't cause problems is DL and squat. Any other heavy extensions or other movements just cause problems so I just squat. Even hack squat destroys me 

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On 3/10/2017 at 1:23 PM, Gains said:

How long have you been training for? Have you recently made a lot of relatively fast progress re: upping your weights? Also when doing leg extensions, do you fully lock your knees out at the top of each extension?

I have now been training 4 days a week for about 6 months+,

When I started with leg extensions for example, I was doing about 20kgs, lately I can do 55kgs, but that has been over 6 months period, so I am not sure whether that is fast or not...

I try not to lock my knees at the top,

But I have now stopped doing leg extensions/curls and the pain is still there but it is not as bad anymore, I can very slightly feel it when I try to get up.

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10 minutes ago, Gains said:

I would be, given that it's a single, simple isolation movement restricted by the design of the machine. Seems pretty foolproof, although maybe if you've got it set up improperly, i.e. the padded crosspiece is sat too far up your shins...

Letting the negative crash down and catching it at the bottom

Starting with arse out the seat and almost turning it into a compound movement

1/2 reps

...all the above caused mainly by the use of too much weight.

Any jerking/kicking/snatching movement will amplify the stain passing through the tendons by many times over.

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13 hours ago, Gains said:

I started training a long time ago, but I do remember having quite a lot of joint pain around the 6-9 month mark (mine was mainly wrists, elbows and shoulders) and a few of the older, more experienced guys at the gym said it was basically because my muscles were getting stronger faster than my joints could adapt. In your case if you consider that you've almost tripled the load on your legs within 6 months, it could just be that.

However it's not even like you can really get your form screwed up on leg extensions or curls and accidentally put loads of strain on your knees (although I've always avoided completely locking my knees on extensions) so another possibility could be tightening of the muscles as they grow stronger is pulling your knees slightly out of alignment. When my glutes get stronger they get tight and twist my hips slightly and I start getting lower back pain. That's easily sorted with occasional stretching though (don't stretch before training but you can do it afterwards if you want). I'd try doing some quad, hamstring and glute stretches to see if that helps.
 

So would you suggest, going down a bit on the weights for a while ? will also give stretching a go as I do it a bit but not much

13 hours ago, 2004mark said:

You'd be supprised.

OP where is the pain? Do you feel anything at all when training?

It is around my knee cap area, I don't feel the "pain" when I am training, it is usually after 4-6 hours later when I get up from a chair or something and just use my legs to get up, but If I push up with my arms, its fine, and it does not hurt when I walk around, its just the moment I get up from sitting down.

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My knees are pretty shot after many years if training. I have the same issue, training is fine, its the sitting to the standing position that gets me.  Trial and error has taught me 

1. Stretching, Stretching , Stretching  is vital for any joint. I don't mean in the gym, at home when you're looking at your phone etc. Proper stretching takes time, so makes gyms sessions too long. So at home stretch out hams, quads. you can easily stretch your quad in bed at night. For hams, can just lie of the floor and one leg up against the door frame and sty light that for several minutes .  And its a long term habit rather than a once off 

2. Speed of movement seems to have an effect, on leg extension, swiftly pulling the weight and jerking at the top is not helping your knees. Similarly on the start of the rep, rapidly forcing the weight puts an initial strain on the tendons. Funnily enough I accidentally came across this as with many leg extensions machines the weights are too light so I was trying to slow down and increase the time for muscle under load to aid resistance  

3. For legs you can drop the weight up the reps, still will have no problem building muscle. In fact some people swear by high reps for legs 

4. Lots of light movements. Well this is what my chiropractor tells me. For example, sitting on a table and swinging your legs like a kid helps polish the knee cap and gets the fluid more supple and warmed up (I think thats the theory ). Point is the knee cap isn't being pulling hard into the knee like a gym movement. They also tell my Dad to do this because of his arthritis. Reckons it helps  

.... of course I pften don't follow my own advice but still, it works for me, when I actually make an effort to do it.

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17 hours ago, Gains said:

I would be, given that it's a single, simple isolation movement restricted by the design of the machine. Seems pretty foolproof, although maybe if you've got it set up improperly, i.e. the padded crosspiece is sat too far up your shins...

Even simple machines I still see people doing them wrong, they use a rapid kick to get the weight going and momentum takes the weight to the top position rapidly. Never pause (ok maybe not necessary) but pointing to that the weight is just too heavy for the user. Easy mistake to make on many gym machines

 

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On ‎3‎/‎3‎/‎2017 at 11:43 AM, SimpleLimit said:

So after a leg day (5-6 hours after), I can feel a pain in my knees when I try to stand up after sitting down,

 

I believe it might be related to doing Leg extensions and Leg curls but I am not sure, any ideas how to deal with this ?

Most if not all leg extension machines have you initiate the leg movement in the most terrible position possible, placing undue stress on the connective tissues surrounding your knee.

Lifters who are not aware of this fact, go to further increase this stress that eventually leads to damaged knees, by accentuating what is already a bad design built within leg extension machines. How is that? You see, most leg extension machines have you start the leg extension with your lower leg at about 100 degrees, if not 110 degrees. In plain English, this means your lower leg is sitting at a weak and vulnerable position tucked a bit below your upper leg, as the following image below illustrates...

81244b21a2cea759353d6177f21217b4.jpg

That's a big no no, but hey man, what can I do, the machine forces me to start in that weak position. OK, what you can do, is not make it worse, and only have rep #1 be governed by this faulty design, and all other reps returning to a point of no more than a 90 degree angle, and preferably even an 80 degree at that. Please see the image below.

Figure 1.

So yes to the above, and most definitely no to the one below:

993ee6db55014c0f81896e997adf61df.jpg

Give the above a try and monitor your body's feedbacks.

Thanks.

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19 hours ago, Fadi65 said:

Most if not all leg extension machines have you initiate the leg movement in the most terrible position possible, placing undue stress on the connective tissues surrounding your knee.

Lifters who are not aware of this fact, go to further increase this stress that eventually leads to damaged knees, by accentuating what is already a bad design built within leg extension machines. How is that? You see, most leg extension machines have you start the leg extension with your lower leg at about 100 degrees, if not 110 degrees. In plain English, this means your lower leg is sitting at a weak and vulnerable position tucked a bit below your upper leg, as the following image below illustrates...

81244b21a2cea759353d6177f21217b4.jpg

That's a big no no, but hey man, what can I do, the machine forces me to start in that weak position. OK, what you can do, is not make it worse, and only have rep #1 be governed by this faulty design, and all other reps returning to a point of no more than a 90 degree angle, and preferably even an 80 degree at that. Please see the image below.

Figure 1.

So yes to the above, and most definitely no to the one below:

993ee6db55014c0f81896e997adf61df.jpg

Give the above a try and monitor your body's feedbacks.

Thanks.

Most machines how are adjustable on the angle anyway, right? but nevertheless, good to know! I never considered it before to be honest. I never go past the 90deg mark  anyway but might be worth easing up of that.

Maybe that's what the cause of my bad knees are.  So on a leg press where do you advocate placing the feet?

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21 minutes ago, JohhnyC said:

Most machines how are adjustable on the angle anyway, right? but nevertheless, good to know! I never considered it before to be honest. I never go past the 90deg mark  anyway but might be worth easing up of that.

Maybe that's what the cause of my bad knees are.  So on a leg press where do you advocate placing the feet?

The obvious answer would be where it doesn't hurt. However this is the way it goes with the leg press: the lower your feet placement, the greater stress that is placed onto your knees. BTW, the same hold true for the hack squats, if you happen to do that exercise as well.

So the higher the feet placement, the more focus onto your upper quads. Feet spacing plays a part as well, as the wider your feet, the more your inner thighs are targeted. Then you have the pointing of your toes, again that determines which part of the muscle dominates more or less. Always be mindful, that wherever your toes are pointing, your knees should follow. Not something that is afforded to us whilst performing the squats, as with that exercise, you point your toes either slightly out or straight ahead, depending on your body's mechanics. For me it was always toes pointed slightly out.

All the best to you mate.

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If the pain is within the knee, it's probably patellafemoral pain (tibia needs to come forward, strengthen rectus femoris). If the pain is below the knee cap, it's probably jumper's knee (tibia too far forward, need to go back - strengthen hamstrings). See how to correct it in my article below.

 

https://treningogrehab.no/resolve-knee-pain-alignment/

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