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Jatin Bhatia

Downside of Vitamin C on Endurance training

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Hello Folks,

As the title says, are there any downsides of taking Vitamin C on the endurance exercise and Muscle building?. I, generally take 1 gm of Vitamin C after the exercise.

Views Please

It can be used as a natural diuretic in higher doses. Not aware of any downsides.

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I don't think it has a major negatives post training .

But .. I'd does reduce muscular inflammation , maybe post wo isn't the time you would want it if muscle building is your goal .

This may be utter boll0ks though its just a brain fart of something I heard a while back .

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On 3/27/2016 at 4:20 PM, Drew27 said:

I don't think it has a major negatives post training .

But .. I'd does reduce muscular inflammation , maybe post wo isn't the time you would want it if muscle building is your goal .

This may be utter boll0ks though its just a brain fart of something I heard a while back .

It has. There are some recent studies that suggest antioxidant supplements like vit c or vit e may reduce the adaptive response to exercise

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4 hours ago, UK2USA said:

Just as an aside...Vit c is also recommended for people taking NAC since NAC can cause kidney stones and vitamin c prevents that.

Never knew this about NAC , at what dose where they taking to cause kidney stones ?

 

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5 hours ago, Drew27 said:

Never knew this about NAC , at what dose where they taking to cause kidney stones ?

 

N-acetyl cysteine is much more stable and resistant to being oxidized to an insoluble form than cysteine. However, as N-acetyl cysteine is metabolized by the body, a small portion of it may be oxidized and become insoluble. Experts believe the insoluble remnants of NAC could eventually form into kidney stones.

Preventing NAC Oxidation

Interestingly, another common antioxidant can prevent the oxidation of glutathione. Vitamin C, also known as ascorbic acid, will help prevent glutathione from becoming oxidized and potentially leading to kidney stones. According to Vitamin C researcher Mark Moyad, MD, MPH, of the University of Michigan, “Vitamin C has received a great deal of attention, and with good reason. Higher blood levels of Vitamin C may be the ideal nutrition marker for overall health.”

 

 

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I've always been a little unsure whether large dose anti-oxident supplementation may have a negative effect on the adaptations we're trying to achieve from training. Logically, if any part of the adaptation results from the body reacting to metabolic stress, do we really want to try to diminish this?

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24492839

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25384788

I bought some tart cherry extract that did seem to help reduce DOMS but I stopped taking it due to related concerns.

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