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HEAD AR5E INSPECTOR UKM
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na id rest it out, plenty of vits and good food and some good rest doing jack.. you'll be better in no time... dont go gym, you'll feel like 5hite, you may make yourslef a little worse and you'll prob make everyone else ill too.
 

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Someone make it stop.....
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1,955 Posts
Been here before. Probably post6ed it before but here's a document I wrote to give to my clients:

To understand why it is not advisable to exercise when you are sick, you need to understand how the body deals with infections, and specifically the lymphatic system which is similar to the circulatory system but it carries tissue fluid, or lymph through lymphatic capillaries & ducts.





The lymphatic capillaries, will have in them, floating around, large protein molecules, white blood cells, dead cells, bacterial debris, and all manner of infected substances. The lymphatic system is there to filter these things form the body. Increased muscular activity from exercise will increase the flow of lymphatic circulation as it is not pumped round like the blood by the heart, it relies on activity from muscular contractions, gravity etc to move it around..






All the lymphatic trunks eventually join either the thoracic duct, or the right lymphatic duct. The right lymphatic duct drains directly into the right subclavian vein, and the thoracic duct drains into the left subclavian vein. The subclavian veins join the jugular to form the superior vena cava
which opens up into the right atrium of the heart.





Now imagine all this infected gunk floating around, being concentrated on the heart faster than normal by increased lymphatic flow.






Still want to train? Then consider this. When you are ill, the body's number one priority is dealing with the infection, be it bacterial or viral. It does not give one hoot about growing muscle, or getting fitter and quite rightly so. Any training will be at best unproductive, but is more likely to cause a slight regression in progress and prolong the time it takes the body to deal with the problem.
 

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Dieting :(
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2,821 Posts
Nine Pack said:
Been here before. Probably post6ed it before but here's a document I wrote to give to my clients:

To understand why it is not advisable to exercise when you are sick, you need to understand how the body deals with infections, and specifically the lymphatic system which is similar to the circulatory system but it carries tissue fluid, or lymph through lymphatic capillaries & ducts.

The lymphatic capillaries, will have in them, floating around, large protein molecules, white blood cells, dead cells, bacterial debris, and all manner of infected substances. The lymphatic system is there to filter these things form the body. Increased muscular activity from exercise will increase the flow of lymphatic circulation as it is not pumped round like the blood by the heart, it relies on activity from muscular contractions, gravity etc to move it around..

All the lymphatic trunks eventually join either the thoracic duct, or the right lymphatic duct. The right lymphatic duct drains directly into the right subclavian vein, and the thoracic duct drains into the left subclavian vein. The subclavian veins join the jugular to form the superior vena cava which opens up into the right atrium of the heart.

Now imagine all this infected gunk floating around, being concentrated on the heart faster than normal by increased lymphatic flow.

Still want to train? Then consider this. When you are ill, the body's number one priority is dealing with the infection, be it bacterial or viral. It does not give one hoot about growing muscle, or getting fitter and quite rightly so. Any training will be at best unproductive, but is more likely to cause a slight regression in progress and prolong the time it takes the body to deal with the problem.
Last time I train with a cold :thumbup1:
 

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Can sort of still be ar$ed with this game
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1,218 Posts
As a general rule of thumb, if you have any sort of fever, general rise in temperature etc, then do not train. As per Paul's comments, its counter-productive, although unless its full blown flu, is unlikely to do too much damage, its just a waste of time and is likely to delay the recuperation.

If the cold is just localised to runny nose, then you should be ok. If the symptoms last more than 2-3 days, then consider it more than a common cold and stop training to get better.

STOW
 

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Pumping Iron
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578 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Cheers Guy going to put my feet up and sweat it out, bit peed off as just got over serious Tonsillitis and mouth infections and only trained for the first time in over two weeks on tuesday.

Found it so hard lost a lot of strength, its amazing that you train hard for 6 weeks find your getting somwhere and gaining then whamm your knocked back to square one again.
 

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www.bodybuildingdepot.co. uk
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9,170 Posts
I once thought I could go to gym on a cold and work it out. i spent two days on my back afterwards. Id' say from personnel experience if it's a light cold then some light exercise and hit the sauna. But a heavy cold why risks.

Though reading ninepacks post I have to wonder about even light training.
 

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Getting HUGE!
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Hmmm. I see what you mean about lymphatics 9pack but lymph should be filtered and completely cleansed by the lymph nodes before its emptied back into the blood. There certainly isnt aload of gunk pumping into the heart as it were.

anyway, your second point is valid. The same cells that are involved in the first stages of muscular adaptation (mainly the granular leukocytes) are recruited to fight infection during an innate immune response and the latter will take priority.

So, aside from passing on your cold to some other poor soul in the gym how well you adapt to training will be massively compromised when you have an infection.

Alternatively, after 2-3 days from the first sign of symptoms if the infection still persists some light activity should promote blood flow and speed recovery.

Rest, get over it asap and only when your recovered hit the gym.
 

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Getting HUGE!
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TaintedSoul said:
I once thought I could go to gym on a cold and work it out. i spent two days on my back afterwards. Id' say from personnel experience if it's a light cold then some light exercise and hit the sauna. But a heavy cold why risks.

Though reading ninepacks post I have to wonder about even light training.
Makes sense mate. during and immediately after training your immunity is lowered quite a lot. you normally respond by rebounding and attaining higher levels of immunity than before but with an infection exercise will just stiffle the immune response that is taking place.

See my last point above about what type of activity is ok and when. It takes 2-3 days for a more serious infection to be responded to by which time some very light cardio (brisk walk tops HR <130bpm) will be beneficial. Certainly nothing that creates an O2 debt.
 

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www.bodybuildingdepot.co. uk
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pauly7582 said:
Makes sense mate. during and immediately after training your immunity is lowered quite a lot. you normally respond by rebounding and attaining higher levels of immunity than before but with an infection exercise will just stiffle the immune response that is taking place.

See my last point above about what type of activity is ok and when. It takes 2-3 days for a more serious infection to be responded to by which time some very light cardio (brisk walk tops HR <130bpm) will be beneficial. Certainly nothing that creates an O2 debt.
Cheers mate.. .and congrats on the Sheriff... I just made you one! :thumb:
 

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Getting HUGE!
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Only a fool would train with a cold or any other sort of sickness.

Regardless of how severe it is, if its anything more than the sniffles it would take a real fool to go to the gym.

Not only are they going to spread it to everyone else in the gym. But also risk fuking themselves up.
 
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