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Getting HUGE!
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So I had a pain in what I thought was just more forearm but it’s now led to tennis elbow. Just can’t help thinking it could be because iv been doing too many different exercises on my biceps. I currently may do 4/5 different variations on my biceps and i think it’s caught up on me.
Just wondering how many exercises do you do on one body part. My thought behind is maybe do more on the bigger muscle groups such as shoulders or chest but with biceps being a smaller muscle maybe clamp down on the number I do now.
 

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Biceps, triceps, forearms, abs, hips etc.. are all worked through compound movements.

How much work you put towards them really depends on what your whole training programme looks like. I haven't had an "arm day" in years, however train my triceps as accessory work twice a week after a main lift and direct accessory. Bare in mind that i train as a powerlifter and strong triceps are essential for the bench press. If you don't care about strength at lockout you could get away with less.

For example you might have bench press on a Tuesday, followed by rear delt flys, followed by a JM press etc..

Then pressing overhead on a Friday, followed by lat or core work, followed by seated banded pin press.

That's 4 reasonably heavy movements for the triceps each week which i find plenty.

Other tips to help prevent tendonitis is to rotate the main lift and accessory work often, and incorporate band use for warmups. I recommend watching Matt Wenning on YouTube to see how he does them.

The only bicep training is usually do is negative preacher curls, where you use a heavy weight and instead of curling it up you start at the top and resist it lowering down, similar to how an arm wrestler trains. This helps to prevent bicep tears in a mixed grip deadlift.
 
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