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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Anybody made or considering the switch?

Whey is/was the only dairy I still consume (not a fan of dairy and wanted to drop it for ethical/conservation reasons), and the recent price hikes have given me the incentive to try pea protein (also, if brexit goes ahead then there's going to be a massive hike in the cost of whey).

Started using unflavoured isolate, pretty good in porridge but I have to add more sweetener/honey to mask the earthy taste.

I'm still using the remaining whey I have for my PWO shake, so not tried pea isolate in water yet, but I can see it being a challenge...
 

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Anybody made or considering the switch?

Whey is/was the only dairy I still consume (not a fan of dairy and wanted to drop it for ethical/conservation reasons), and the recent price hikes have given me the incentive to try pea protein (also, if brexit goes ahead then there's going to be a massive hike in the cost of whey).

Started using unflavoured isolate, pretty good in porridge but I have to add more sweetener/honey to mask the earthy taste.

I'm still using the remaining whey I have for my PWO shake, so not tried pea isolate in water yet, but I can see it being a challenge...
I've had two friends go over to it, one was happy and didn't really notice any difference but the other had pretty bad wind at both ends and issues with digestion.

Worth giving it a try for the reasons you mention, but I guess there's also the 'if it aint broke don't fix it' argument to be had especially as you're using isolate already and have no issues.

Kind of along the same lines, I have been thinking of using collagen protein here and there as well as my whey isolate.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Funny you should mention the wind issues. I had a bit of bloating and upset guts during the first two weeks (and pea protein is reported to be the least allergenic...).

It makes the porridge a bit gummy, like you've added some guar or xanthan gum.
 

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I guess it's just a case of the body adapting in the first couple of weeks, I'm not great with whey concentrates certainly when I used to consume 1 or 2 a day in my younger years - they don't give me discomfort or digestive issues just very windy and I also didn't like how sweet they were with all the sucralose packed in to them.

I only use isolate now and don't have any problems at all so I've always stuck with it, only tend to have shakes if I'm running late in the morning so I probably wouldn't notice a major difference if I switched now.

If it's working though and not making food unbearable, it's definitely a worthwhile solution for the reasons you stated initially - I dare say over the next couple of years there will be even more whey alternatives which will continue to get better.

I'm lucky that I regularly get 2.25kg of isolate for £20 from a wholesale Holland and Barrett near me, but as you say the price of these online retailers now is absurd, due no doubt to paying all these tits on social media to promote their products, they might gain the custom of a few naïve kids but the elder generation that use is regularly will be off to find alternative solutions.
 

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Kind of along the same lines, I have been thinking of using collagen protein here and there as well as my whey isolate.
I'm sure you know what I'm about to share with you here mate, however for the benefits of other readers who may not be aware, I've got this to say re the subject of collagen protein.

For someone like me, and for many people around the world who don't particularly subscribe to the modern way of eating animal products, we find it odd that what has always been a natural part and parcel of the human diet, is now being touted as something extraordinarily special.

Enter collagen, or Hydrolysed collagen etc.

Before I go deeper into this, let me first identify two very special amino acids at play here, namely leucine and glycine.

Back when I was growing up in the 70s, I vividly remember the way an animal was cooked and eaten, with some of its parts eaten raw, namely its liver. What is the significance of this? Well, to eat meat today, is to eat an incomplete protein food! Yes, an exclamation mark because on the surface, it appears that I've just made an unwarranted, (and to some), wrong statement. I mean come on Fadi, how can you say meat protein is an incomplete protein, where have you been mate! Protein (the fleshy part of the animal), is incredibly good at building muscles, it's what you would call muscle protein. However, this particular protein, which is very high in the main driver of protein synthesis, the amino acid leucine, is a poor candidate for building what our muscles rely on to move properly, and here we welcome the human connective tissues to the party.

I did say "enter collagen" right!

What makes collagen powder special (and unique in comparison to muscle protein), is the amino acid glycine. This amino acid is attached to all the animal tissue you and I can not eat if we resort to cooking (and exclusively eating) the animal meaty part. This special amino acid is the driver of connective tissue building and as well as having healthy looking skin (you guessed it ... made up most of glycine and proline), amino acids that are abundant in animal joints, which could only be gotten at by prolonged and slow cooking, extracting/releasing every bit of goodness that is locked within the joints of the animal we choose to eat. Muscle meat is a poor provider of such goodness.

If one chooses to eat meat, and wants to ensure a completely balanced approach to both health and muscle building, then one must eat the whole animal (organs included), and not just its fleshy parts, for that's the only way to achieve the proper balance between all available amino acids, and in particular, to counteract the overreliance on the amino acid methionine, which when left to reign supreme without balancing it with the amino acid glycine, health issues begin to manifest as time moves forward.

Bone broth is a great idea to consume the amino acid glycine. One can also supplement with it, however it's never the same, just like supplementing with the amino acid leucine, without its mates ... it's never the same.

This has surely dragged ... sorry about that mate ... I'll apply the breaks here and now.
 

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@Fadi

interesting post, its stock standard to eat all animal parts here in Asia, often it's a lot more expensive too. In Japan raw chicken , raw beef livers is a common occurance on a menu whereas in UK it would have the health inspectors in. Here in China, there are a load of fish head restaurants, basically they mostly sell fish heads, its high brow cuisines too . They believe the brain, eyes, nutrients etc contain the most nutrients.

I was very hesitant at first to eat these parts but years later i haven't had a single health issue
 

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I'm sure you know what I'm about to share with you here mate, however for the benefits of other readers who may not be aware, I've got this to say re the subject of collagen protein.

For someone like me, and for many people around the world who don't particularly subscribe to the modern way of eating animal products, we find it odd that what has always been a natural part and parcel of the human diet, is now being touted as something extraordinarily special.

Enter collagen, or Hydrolysed collagen etc.

Before I go deeper into this, let me first identify two very special amino acids at play here, namely leucine and glycine.

Back when I was growing up in the 70s, I vividly remember the way an animal was cooked and eaten, with some of its parts eaten raw, namely its liver. What is the significance of this? Well, to eat meat today, is to eat an incomplete protein food! Yes, an exclamation mark because on the surface, it appears that I've just made an unwarranted, (and to some), wrong statement. I mean come on Fadi, how can you say meat protein is an incomplete protein, where have you been mate! Protein (the fleshy part of the animal), is incredibly good at building muscles, it's what you would call muscle protein. However, this particular protein, which is very high in the main driver of protein synthesis, the amino acid leucine, is a poor candidate for building what our muscles rely on to move properly, and here we welcome the human connective tissues to the party.

I did say "enter collagen" right!

What makes collagen powder special (and unique in comparison to muscle protein), is the amino acid glycine. This amino acid is attached to all the animal tissue you and I can not eat if we resort to cooking (and exclusively eating) the animal meaty part. This special amino acid is the driver of connective tissue building and as well as having healthy looking skin (you guessed it ... made up most of glycine and proline), amino acids that are abundant in animal joints, which could only be gotten at by prolonged and slow cooking, extracting/releasing every bit of goodness that is locked within the joints of the animal we choose to eat. Muscle meat is a poor provider of such goodness.

If one chooses to eat meat, and wants to ensure a completely balanced approach to both health and muscle building, then one must eat the whole animal (organs included), and not just its fleshy parts, for that's the only way to achieve the proper balance between all available amino acids, and in particular, to counteract the overreliance on the amino acid methionine, which when left to reign supreme with balancing it out with the amino acid glycine, health issues begin to manifest as time moves forward.

Bone broth is a great idea to consume the amino acid glycine. One can also supplement with it, however it's never the same, just like supplementing with the amino acid leucine, without its mates ... it's never the same.

This has surely dragged ... sorry about that mate ... I'll apply the breaks here and now.
Agree with everything you've said here and that's one of the main reasons that I've been considering it to be honest, as I say there are no issues for me regarding whey but I'd read the apparent genuine benefits of collagen protein which is a lot cheaper and also still unknown to the average gym goer, hence always been absurdly cheap and on offer. So with my minimal protein powder usage makes sense in a lot of ways.

Interesting you also mention methionine which funnily enough isn't present in pea protein, something which has been stated as a disadvantage of supplementing it, but as you rightly point out It really isn't, in fact it's the total opposite!
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Interesting points about the collagen protein.

Never tried fish heads. Ox liver and lambs kidney are a regular part of my diet. Both are cheap in the UK as most people don't eat them.

I usually buy a kg of ox liver, cook it, then finely chop it and freeze in small portions. I then add it to many meals for both nutrition and flavouring.
 

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To be honest from an amino profile perspective it's going to minimal and if you did suffer with lactose issues, then in theory the slight edge whey has would be offset by this.

As discussed above methionine & tyrosine are the only two really lacking in pea protein, neither of which are imperative - Tyrosine can be supplemented separately and is effectively a pre cursor to norepinephrine and dopamine therefore not really essential and Fadi touches upon methionine above.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I have similar reservations about soy. I'm fine with natural or at least fermented soy foods, but I wouldn't supplement with a soy protein isolate on a daily basis.

Also, bulk powders pea isolate is cheaper than their soy.
 

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seeing that meat and dairy marketing boards are responsible for the crap spouted about soy I'd

take what they say with a pinch of salt :)
Well I mean the above link plus many other medical studies have found and proven a link to phytoestrogens and soy, so I wouldn't class it as spouting crap propaganda.

Appreciate for a lot of people it won't be a massive issue day to day, which is why I said personally I wouldn't use it in my above post as opposed to saying nobody should.

I just think there are better options out there and as Dylan points out above, cheaper options too but as with all things it's a game of opinions.

LT
 

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Well I mean the above link plus many other medical studies have found and proven a link to phytoestrogens and soy, so I wouldn't class it as spouting crap propaganda.

Appreciate for a lot of people it won't be a massive issue day to day, which is why I said personally I wouldn't use it in my above post as opposed to saying nobody should.

I just think there are better options out there and as Dylan points out above, cheaper options too but as with all things it's a game of opinions.

LT
a lone Russian concluding nothing and asking for more research is nothing :)

Feminizing effect of phytoestrogens and soy products may be subtle, detectable only statistically in large populations;
 

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Have been using pea isolate for some time. Tbh, better texture than whey isolate and once flavoured, more enjoyable.

Start with lower amounts as it contains a lot of arginine which can induce diarreaoh in some.

I personally think it's a better product overall, than whey. Why? Better tolerance, less digestive issues, cheaper, more sustainable, can bake with it, put it in soups etc.

I do use a 97% isolate on occasion but with the recent hike in whey prices, there's more reason not to use it.

Also try making pea isolate with a lot less water; 100-150ml. It will turn very thick and you can eat it like a pudding.

I use myprotein flavour drops to flavour mine. MP also do a good flavoured vegan blend. It's a bit of a rip off (compared to pea isolate) as it's basically pea isolate with like 5% flavabean but the flavours are great. I use coffee walnut.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Just discovered the thickening property of pea isolate. I mixed it with almond milk to pour over granola (pre bed snack with squat session in morning).

In the shaker it was fine, just like water. Put granola in a bowl, then went to pour the almond milk over and it was almost solid. Mixed in with the granola it was great.

Interesting point about introducing in smaller amounts due to the arginine. I never had diarrhoea, but definitely upset guts which seems to have gone now after a few weeks of using it.

I'm going to try using it to make seitan with a mix of gluten and pea isolate (plus marmite, liquid smoke and some spices).
 
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