UK-Muscle.co.uk Forum banner
1 - 5 of 5 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,941 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
In 2001, it was hypothesised that milk consumption may affect estrogen levels,

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11601881/

The major sources of animal-derived estrogen's in the human diet are milk and dairy products, which account for 60-70% of the estrogens consumed. Humans consume milk obtained from heifers in the latter half of pregnancy, when the estrogen levels in cows are markedly elevated. The milk that we now consume may be quite unlike that consumed 100 years ago.
a 2010 study showed short term decreases in testosterone, and increases in estrogen, after milk consumption,

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19496976

After the intake of cow milk, serum estrone (E1) and progesterone concentrations significantly increased, and serum luteinizing hormone, follicle-stimulating hormone and testosterone significantly decreased in men. Urine concentrations of E1, estradiol, estriol and pregnanediol significantly increased in all adults and children.
since these exogenous hormones are fat-soluble, it is possible that skim milk may have a smaller effect on hormones.

in 2009, estrogen metabolite levels were measured in milk, and skim milk had the lowest unconjugated (free) EM levels,

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19217359

The results show that the milk products tested contain considerable levels of EM; however, the levels of unconjugated EM in skim milk were substantially lower than that observed in whole milk, 2% milk, and buttermilk. Whole milk contained the lowest overall levels of EM while buttermilk contained the highest. As anticipated, soy milk did not contain the mammalian EM measured using this method.
in a 2008 study on milk consumption and acne in teenaged boys, there was a positive association with skim milk and acne, possibly due to increased androgen levels,

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18194824

In conclusion, skim milk intake was associated with the prevalence of acne in adolescent boys. Our data support the concept that this may be a result of ingested milk's effect on acnegenic androgen levels, possibly in part because of raised testosterone resulting from a hyperinsulinemic and IGF-I-mediated stimulus and in part caused by the dihydrotestoster-one precursors present in milk, which may have biological effects in the consumer. This raises the possibility that other hormonally sensitive glands may also be affected by the hormonal constituents of milk.
in 2012, skim milk consumption was found to be associated with a lower risk of asthenozoospermia,

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22940769/

Conversely, being in the highest tertile of total fruits and vegetables, the intake of dark green vegetables, skim milk, poultry and sea food intake was associated with a lower risk of asthenozoospermia
in 2013, dairy intake was found to be inversely related to sperm morphology and motility in young, physically active men. this association was stronger for full-fat dairy and independent of overall diet,

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23670169/

Total dairy food intake was inversely related to sperm morphology. This association was mostly driven by intake of full-fat dairy foods... Full-fat dairy intake was also associated with significantly lower percent progressively motile sperm
finally, in 2014, it was found that consumption of low-fat dairy, in particular low-fat milk, was positively related to sperm concentration and motility. full-fat dairy was not associated with any relationship for non-smokers, and these associations were independent of overall diet,

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24636397

Low-fat dairy intake was positively related to sperm concentration and progressive motility... These associations were primarily explained by intake of low-fat milk... Cheese intake was associated with lower sperm concentration among ever-smokers.
Conclusion:Skimmed milk is the hormonally better option than full fat.
 

·
ô¿ô
Joined
·
16,669 Posts
Could you post a link to where you took that from please? (Unless this is your own summary of the research?)

I need to find time to look through this! If you'd asked me before I would have definitely favoured full-fat milk, which is what I drink. Partly as a saturated fat source in my diet (which I want for testosterone levels) and partly as I've also heard of some negative health concerns re. skimmed milk (although I've never properly looked at this). Oh, and full-fat milk tastes better of course!

One aspect to look at here is whether this applies to all milk, or just that in the US where hormones are used in milk production (they aren't in the EU).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,941 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Could you post a link to where you took that from please? (Unless this is your own summary of the research?)

I need to find time to look through this! If you'd asked me before I would have definitely favoured full-fat milk, which is what I drink. Partly as a saturated fat source in my diet (which I want for testosterone levels) and partly as I've also heard of some negative health concerns re. skimmed milk (although I've never properly looked at this). Oh, and full-fat milk tastes better of course!

One aspect to look at here is whether this applies to all milk, or just that in the US where hormones are used in milk production (they aren't in the EU).
Copied from here:

https://www.uk-muscle.co.uk/index.php?app=core&module=system&controller=embed&url=https://www.reddit.com/r/bodybuilding/comments/5w9qqd/the_potential_hormonal_effects_of_fullfat_and/
 
1 - 5 of 5 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top