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  1. Indeed. I listened to some of Mike Israetel's stuff before and I found it very interesting, so I'll definetly look him up regarding this. when you say see how long you last, I'd be interested to know how you determine when you're reached your limit? Would that just be general fatigue and a drop in strength?
  2. And I know the pump isn't indicitive of growth, but I thought it at least demonstrated that the muscle is being worked, so that's interesting.
  3. I've been doing leg curls for hamstrings. And then they're hit with deadlifts, so I hadn't been doing a hamstring exercise in my dead lift days. thanks
  4. Extensions definetly get them. Haven't tried lunges yet but didn't get on too well with front squats. They felt awkward and I was nervous about the way you need to hold the bar. I'll have to give them another go and have a look at some more form videos. cheers!
  5. Hi. I had a couple of questions regarding quad training. For some reason, I just never feel they're firing particularly well. The only exercise where I really feel it along with getting a pump is with leg extensions. Squats and leg press I feel it way more in the glutes and hamstrings. Hack squats are an improvement but I still feel something is missing. I know certain positioning can illicit different engagement of muscles with these exercises, so I was wondering if you could advise based on your experience with that. thanks!
  6. Well this is what I'm finding. It's this balancing act and it's hard to know what is too much and what is too little. a lot of people I've seen place emphasis on "feel". "Take an extra day off if you feel you need it". The thing is, I can never judge anything on feel as I presume a lot of that is experienced people that have learned their bodies. A stage I'm not at yet. because of this I spend a fair bit of time worrying about whether or not I've done too little, done too much, whether I'm recovered or not etc. This is what I've been using recently. I found it online but it was just a picture on Pinterest. Because of this there was no set and rep scheme with it; so I'd been doing the Dorian Yates style 1 easy warm up 10-12reps, after adding weight one medium warm up at 10reps and then adding weight again for final set to failure. But yeah, It's certainly complicated as you say. MONDAY: Squat, barbell bench press variation, pull ups variation, barbell overhead press, calf raises, barbell bicep curl, tricep extention TUESDAY REST WEDNESDAY: Leg press, deadlift, side lateral raises, Stiff leg deadlift, cable cross over, crunches, trap exercise THURSDAY REST FRIDAY: Squat, Dumbbell press variation, row variation, dumbbell shoulder press, calf raises, Incline dumbbell curl, skull crushers SATURDAY REST SUNDAY REST REPEAT
  7. Yeah that makes sense. and about six months or so now. I wasn't really asking to applie it to myself, just out of curiosity. I'm going to university in September to study exercise science so I'm just genuenly interested. that said, as a beginner I do have trouble with knowing when I am fully recovered or how hard I should push in the gym to allow myself full recovery. Some workouts I feel I could do more, or feel that after a given exercise the muscle hasn't been fully worked but I don't know whether that's just my lack of experience or whether more work should be done. For example I was doing bench press the other day. I've been following the one easy warmup set, one moderate warm up set, and one failure set approach, and after I hit failiure on the last set I didn't have much of a pump in my chest and felt perhaps an extra set would be better. I ended up not doing another set for fear that I would be under recovered when it came to my next workout. thanks
  8. Interesting, thanks for the post, Fadi. It seems it is more intense than I thought and you certainly can not stumble into it! I didn't realise it was as much of an accumulative state as it is. it's interesting as well that you couldn't really reach NFOR levels without external motivation.
  9. Hi. I was reading a research paper regarding over training, and it was talking about how over-reaching (a technique I know a lot of athletes use) can often precede over training. this can occur if the person is using non functional over-reaching and goes too far with it, so I understand. Just out of curiosity, I've since been wondering what constitutes over-reaching? What does a workout look like when the goal is to over-reach, and can people end up actually stumbling into it with the "just one more set" mentality seen in new lifters where they think more is better? cheers.
  10. Hi. I found this structure for a full body routine online and was wondering what people thought of it. It was actually just a picture with the below in and I couldn't find the source, so not sure what rep and set scheme it would follow. I do like the look of it, though. 3 days a week with a day rest in between, and then two days rest at the end of the week before starting again. you have all your main compound movements in there, arms hit twice a week. If it does look decent to you as far as structure, what rep and set scheme would you pair with it? I know there is no perfect routine, and that really as a novice you're just looking for something that focuses on progression and contains all the major lifts at least, so this seemed prettt good for that(I think?). Thanks a lot. MONDAY: Squat, barbell bench press variation, pull ups variation, barbell overhead press, calf raises, barbell bicep curl, tricep extention TUESDAY REST WEDNESDAY: Leg press, deadlift, side lateral raises, Stiff leg deadlift, cable cross over, crunches, trap exercise THURSDAY REST FRIDAY: Squat, Dumbbell press variation, row variation, dumbbell shoulder press, calf raises, Incline dumbbell curl, skull crushers SATURDAY REST SUNDAY REST REPEAT
  11. I've been gaining about four months in total. Just over two months straight with what I've been doing now. My strength is going up at the moment. I was just unsure as to whether training for longer than a certain period taxes the central nervous system too much, and you'd be better taking time off regardless. thanks
  12. Well the studies I found were on polyunsaturated fats in general rather than fish oil; they were interesting. I'll link them if any of you guys are interested. On the omega 3: I was under the impression that to extract EPA and DHA from plant sources of omega 3 your body needs to convert ALA first, which is apparently a very inifficient process and you actually end up with a very small amount of omega 3 when all is said and done. i'll keep looking, cheers
  13. The fish oil I've been using has vitamin E I believe. I have to say I dislike fish immensely, so it would make it more difficult for me if I were to cut out the oil. I heard you can buy the actual seaweed the fish set to get the omega-3 oils in the first place, but it's very expensive. cheers
  14. Thanks for the post Fadi. That has certainly peaked my interest and I'll be doing some research into it today. I've found a few studies already, but can you recommend any particularly interesting ones on the topic? thanks
  15. Hi. I hear all the time that taking a week out every now and then or doing a deload week is required, but how do you know when you need it? I've been doing a 3 day a week full body program for over two months now. does this mean it's time for a break? Is there a specific time period where it's time to take some time off? Or is it simply to be used when you feel you're not enjoying the gym as you used to and aren't seeing anymore results? Thank you.